Past SROP Scholars

Juan Carlos  Batarse

Juan Carlos Batarse

Rice University
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Amy Kristof-Brown
Project title
Five-Factor Model of Personality and Work Engagement: A Meta-Analysis
Abstract

This study will report the current status of a meta-analysis investigating the relationship between the traits of the Five-Factor Model of Personality and the various dimensions and measures of job engagement. We are searching for supportive evidence for dispositional influences on job engagement to some considerable extent. Using the model as an organizing framework, correlations from a number of independent samples were classified according to the model. Results will further indicate which dimensions of the FFM will generalize across studies and industries, regarding work engagement.

Elliott  Beenk

Elliott Beenk

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Craig Just
Project title
A Comparative analysis of Sustainable Waste Management Strategies at Live Music Events
Abstract

Each year hundreds of thousands of people attend live music events across the United States. With this comes not only an enjoyable time but also far reaching environmental impacts affecting several areas of the environment. Over recent years there has been an emerging trend of festivals pursuing a variety of sustainability initiatives to lessen their environmental impact. While there has been some research on sustainable festival management, only very limited research exists to measure the effectiveness of these different strategies.

Jessica  Caballero

Jessica Caballero

UPR @ Mayaguez
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Sergio Paradiso
Project title
Men and Women Experience Different Degrees of Empathy Towards Others' Emotions as a Function of Age
Abstract

The capacity to understand and experience the feelings of others (empathy) is lower in older individuals relative to younger adults. Whereas young women are found to have higher empathy than men, studies directly investigating the interaction between aging and gender on empathy have been lacking. We hypothesize gender-specific differences across a lifespan, in particular that women will show higher empathy later in life than men. Participants included 66 younger (25-45) and 59 older (65-85) healthy adults.

Danielle  Caldwell

Danielle Caldwell

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. David Wacker
Project title
Relations Between Neuropsychological Profiles and Choice-Making in Children
Abstract

The current investigation was a case study conducted as part of a larger study on identifying individual differences in preferred mode of directive (i.e. visual, verbal) and cognitive profile on the amount of work completed (task effort). For a visual-motor integration task (design drawing), Olivia, a 7-year-old with a language learning disability, demonstrated a preference of visual directives. In a choice paradigm, an interaction occurred between preference for directive task effort and task difficulty. Olivia completed more tasks (i.e.

Juan  Castillo Tavarez

Juan Castillo Tavarez

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Lori Wallrath
Project title
Modeling Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy in Drosophila
Abstract

Autosomal Dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (AD-EDMD) is an inherited form of muscle disease that affects ~1/100,000 individuals. It is characterized by childhood onset of muscle weakness and wasting, early joint contractures and adult cardiac disease. Currently, there are no treatments for the disease. AD-EDMD is one of twelve diseases that are caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type lamins. Lamins are intermediate filament proteins that play a role in both the determination of the nuclear structure and the regulation of gene expression.

Liliana  Diaz Pla

Liliana Diaz Pla

UPR @ Mayaguez
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Ed Wasserman
Project title
Do Animals Know That They Know? Exploring Metacognition in the Pigeons
Abstract

Metacognition refers to humans’ ability to think about their own thoughts and cognition. We make judgments about what we know and then we use those judgments to control future behavior. There is growing evidence in metacognition in some animals, like monkeys, but not in pigeons. The goal of the study is to see if pigeons too exhibit behavioral evidence of metacognition. To do so, we first trained pigeons on a size discrimination tasks in which they had to choose one of two circles which simultaneously appeared on a computer screen, conditional on the color of the background.

Africa  Fahra

Africa Fahra

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Jennifer Fiegel
Project title
Nanoparticle Interactions With Proteins of the Conducting Airways
Abstract

Using nanoparticles for drug delivery to the lung has shown great promise in treating lung specific and systemic diseases. After inhalation, nanoparticles first deposition on lung fluids. Nanoparticle interactions with these fluids can change the properties of the nanoparticles, thereby altering how they behave in the lungs. The current study focuses on the interactions of nanoparticles and proteins in the conducting airways.

Willie  Frazier

Willie Frazier

Virginia Tech
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Kathleen Sluka
Project title
Determining the Role of Acid Sensing Ion Channel 3 in Fibroblast Like Synoviocyte Apoptosis
Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune joint disease characterized by inflammation and joint hyperplasia. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are key cellular participants in the pathogenesis of RA. Normally, FLS provide a thin lining of the synovial membrane. In RA, FLS over-proliferate and thicken the synovial lining, leading to diminished joint activity and joint damage. Acid sensing ion channels respond to decreases in pH and we previously showed expression of ASIC3 in FLS.

Alfredo  Garcia

Alfredo Garcia

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Gregory Friestad
Project title
Synthesis of Tetrafibricin: C27-C40 Fragment
Abstract

The platelet glyocoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa is the site where tetrafibricin, a GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor, causes conformational changes to prevent platelet aggregation. Tetrafibricin is special for the fact that it is non-peptidic and therefore inhibits platelet aggregation more effectively than peptidic inhibitors. It will help cure various types of heart disease.

Antoine  Gary

Antoine Gary

Univ of Connecticut
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Richard Turner
Project title
Barack Obama: The Notion of a Post-Racial Society
Abstract

President Obama’s office has triggered conversation regarding the concept of a post-racial society. Political pundits and media have spawned debates concerning the relevance of race in a U.S. society in which the president is Black and the population in about 2045 is projected to be majority non-white. Ironically, by examining Obama’s journey to the White House as well as recent racial controversies, the idea of a post racial society is merely a myth.

Maran  Hernandez Rodriguez

Maran Hernandez Rodriguez

UPR @ Rio Piedras
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Sergio Paradiso
Project title
Independent and Not Cumulative Effect of Depression and Alexithymia on Pain Severity
Abstract

Pain severity is typically associated with both depression and alexithymia (a personality trait characterized by poor ability to identify personal emotions). Furthermore, there is a modest but significant relationship between depression and alexithymia. Addressing a gap in the literature, this study directly investigates the relationship between pain, alexithymia, and depression. Methods. Participants included 65 patients with current depression (DSM-IV-TR, 2000) and 96 participants without current depression (i.e.

Sylvia  Hill

Sylvia Hill

Grambling St University
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Elizabeth Altmaier
Project title
Why is a Community Problem Viewed as a Private Matter: Perspectives on Domestic Violence
Abstract

Statement of the problem: Domestic violence is difficult to reduce due to the many different perspectives on its meaning; examples of these perspectives include the victim, his/her children, law enforcement, community program staff, neighbors, clergy, and victim culture. For this particular study, domestic violence is defined as acts of abuse that occur in a household including physical, sexual, mental, emotional, verbal, and spiritual. By definition, domestic violence pertains only to those individuals who cohabitate, have children together, or are intimate partners.

Brett  Hiller

Brett Hiller

U of Ark/Fayetteville
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Al Ratner
Project title
Analysis of Biomass Gasification Data: Production Potential of Wet Versus Dry Paper Sludge
Abstract

Gasification of biomass has become an area of key interest as it is reasonably quick and a direct way of converting material into an efficient fuel source that works in many industrial systems. The purpose of this work is to explore biomass gasification and the comparison between wet and dry paper sludge during the pyrolysis temperature of 800_C, at 1 atm and rapid heating rate. In testing, a small concentration of O2 was added to the gasification agent (N2) to enhance CO yields. The evolution of CO, CO2, CH4, O2, and H2 were measured throughout the pyrolysis process.

Kenneth  Hodges

Kenneth Hodges

Beloit College
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Richard Turner
Project title
New Orleans: Culture of Poverty or a Culture of Resistance
Abstract

The Black Culture of New Orleans and the negative media coverage and representation that followed Hurricane Katrina in 2005 are the subjects of this research. I will analyze the representation by many media and news organizations that perpetuated stereotypes of New Orleans as a Black criminal “culture of poverty”. The purpose of this project is to understand Black New Orleans in a clearer cultural context.

Parnell  Jackson

Parnell Jackson

Susquehanna Univ
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Sydne Mahone
Project title
Heaven At Night
Abstract

Heaven at Night is anything that is currently inside you or rather your unconsciousness. This idea cannot be brought into existence because of lack of resources, experience or simply overall knowledge that has yet to be obtained. For me Heaven at Night is a play that I cannot write because I do not have enough knowledge as a playwright to write it. As a result, my mentor and I decided to start researching myself as a playwright. We did this by focusing on African American theater from the 1850’s to present day.

Cherelle  Johnson

Cherelle Johnson

Central State Univ
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Janette Taylor
Project title
Music Sets Me Free: A Music Intervention with Incarcerated African American Women
Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major public health concern that affects over 4.8 million women annually. African American women experience IPV at a disproportionately higher rate than their white female counterparts. Survivors of IPV experience adverse psychological and physical health consequences, such as, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder, depression, headaches and hypertension. Additionally, a women’s experience of abuse is a risk factor for incarceration.

Sheila  Justiniano Rosario

Sheila Justiniano Rosario

UPR of Mayaguez
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Kathyrn Gerken
Project title
Effectiveness of Kids on the Block Puppet Shows to Change Attitudes of Children Towards Peers With Disabilities
Abstract

Research has shown that children can have negative attitudes towards peers with disabilities (e.g. Nabors & Keyes 1995; Harper 1997; Nabuzoka & Ronning 1997; Nowiki 2003 & Kelly 2004; Ring & Travers 2005), and these attitudes can be different according to the disability. It is important to determine how such attitudes can be changed. Multiples studies have found puppets to be useful in teaching children new information because children enjoy activities that use puppets, and are thus more likely to pay attention and remember what is taught (Campbell, 1993; Major, 1996).

Michael  Kuku

Michael Kuku

Savannah College
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. H.S. Udaykumar
Project title
Blow Flow Experiment as a Model of the Heart Valve Hinge Region
Abstract

The heart has four chambers. The upper two are the right and left atrium. The lower two are the right and left ventricle. Blood is pumped through the chambers aided by four heart valves. The valves open and close fully to let blood flow in only one direction. The four heart valves are the mitral, tricuspid, pulmonary, and the aortic valve. Each of these valves has a set of flaps, also called leaflets or cusps that open and close completely when blood is pumped through the valves. A heart valve disease is any condition that disrupts the proper function of the valve.

Brian  Lewis

Brian Lewis

Columbia University
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Aliasger Salem
Project title
Combination of Chitosan and Dextran as a Novel Gene Delivery System
Abstract

Chitosan is a naturally occurring cationic polymer that is an ideal candidate for drug/gene delivery. However, its transfection efficiency is poor. Our hypothesis is that chitosan binds too strongly to DNA thereby inhibiting its release. Thus, incorporation of an anionic polymer like dextran sulphate can improve its transfection efficiency. In this study we are evaluating if a chitosan and dextran combination is an efficient carrier for DNA. We have used pCpG Luciferase (pCpGLuc) as a model plasmid for testing the efficiency of this delivery system.

Wilbeth  Lugo-Morales

Wilbeth Lugo-Morales

UPR Mayaguez
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Stewart Ehly
Project title
Physical Activity and Depression In Adolescents
Abstract

The present study examines the relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms among adolescents. Previous research has highlighted the importance of physical activity to overall well being. Some studies suggest that when adolescents increased levels of physical activity, they decreased symptoms of depression. The current study’s research questions: To what extent does participation in physical activity relate to symptoms of depression? Does participation in physical activity differ between adolescent males and females in grades 9-12?

Elizabeth  Macias

Elizabeth Macias

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Todd Kopelman
Project title
The Effects of Type of Cues on Task Performance With a Young Girl with Autism and Severe Self-Injurious Behavior
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine if the participants’ level of understanding was related to the cause of her severe self-injurious behavior. We wondered if her problem behavior was due to frustration because she did not fully understand instructions and what she was expected to do. To evaluate this, clinic staff performed one step instructions using vocal cues only or vocal plus visual cues. When instructions were prompted using vocal cues only, the participant responded correctly to one out of four trials.

Vanessa  Mackey

Vanessa Mackey

Spelman College
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Jonathan Doorn
Project title
Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde ON PROTEINS IN PARKINSONS’S DISEASE
Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the loss of the dopaminergic neurons in the substania nigra of the brain, which affects millions of Americans. Individuals that suffer from Parkinson’s disease experience resting tremors, stiff muscles and unconscious movements. One factor in the formation of PD includes toxic metabolites of dopamine (DA). DA is a neurotransmitter that is responsible for movement.

Pablo  Marrero

Pablo Marrero

UPR @ Aguadilla
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Amnon Kohen
Project title
Developing the Tritium Release Assay for Kinetics Measurement of Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase
Abstract

Thymidylate syntheses are essential for DNA biosynthesis and catalyzes the reductive methylation of dUMP (2’-deoxyuridine- 5’momphospate) to form dTMP (2’ deoxythymidine-5’-momphosphate). Humans rely on the thyA encoded classical Thymidylate syntheses whereas many human pathogens produce a novel type of Flavin-dependent Thymidylate synthases (FDTSs), which are encoded by the thyX gene. The molecular mechanism of catalysis differs between classical TS and FDTS, therefore making thyX coded proteins a suitable antimicrobial target.

Bridget  McCaskill

Bridget McCaskill

NC AT&T
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Amanda Haes
Project title
Enhancine Forensic with Gold Nanoparticles
Abstract

Nano particles facilitate a wide range of new functions and purposes in both science and society. The novel, size dependent properties of nanomaterials are central to these applications. For instance, the size dependent optical properties of coinage nanoparticles are known as the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). These optical properties facilitate a phenomenon known as surface enhanced Roman scattering (SERS) and enhances molecular detection in biomedical forensic applications. Herein, gold nanoparticles are used for quick detection of the drug mimic, 2-naphthalenethiol.

Jarvis  McCowin

Jarvis McCowin

Virginia Commonwealth
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Christopher Morphew
Project title
High School Students & the Web: Influences of family, peers, socioeconomic status & high school faculty on navigation & interpretation of college websites
Abstract

Little research is performed as to how college websites play a role in the college choice process of high school students. This research is exploratory in nature because of the fact that there is limited research on how students navigate and understand college and university websites. The study aims to explore how rising high school seniors –who plan to attend a college/university– navigate and understand information on specific college websites.

Tamika  McCue

Tamika McCue

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Deborah Schoenfelder, Todd Ingram
Project title
Late-life Suicide: Secondary Prevention
Abstract

The purpose of this research is to produce revised evidence based guidelines that will provide information for nurses and other healthcare providers to a) recognize risk of suicidal behavior in older adults 65 and above and to b) provide appropriate crisis intervention. A large scale literature review was conducted to collect the information for the guidelines. The information was evaluated for relevancy, reliability, and time frame in relation to our research. In 1999, the Surgeon General issued a call to prevent suicide in the United States.

Mariela  Moll Vega

Mariela Moll Vega

UPR @ Arecibo
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Catherine Cole
Project title
Self-Monitoring and Variety Seeking
Abstract

In an online survey, I examined the relationship between self monitoring and variety seeking. Self-monitoring is defined as a person’s ability to adjust his or her behavior to external situations. High self-monitors tend to engage in a greater variety of behaviors because they are always adjusting to the external situation. Consumers engage in variety seeking when they try a variety of brands in order to avoid boredom. My first hypothesis states that high self-monitors will seek more variety when making candy choices than low self-monitors.

Robin  Mosley

Robin Mosley

DePaul University
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Pamela Wesely
Project title
Examining Japanese Language Textbooks: Invisibility, Language Competence, and Accessibility
Abstract

This study examines three Japanese language textbooks and whether they provide students competence in both the language and culture for beginning level students of Japanese. This includes both reading and writing competence, along with understanding the target language culture. Since there is an increase of students learning Japanese as a second language and in college, it is important to assess how well textbooks for Japanese can create the competence needed to speak, read, and write as well as develop the capabilities to use the language in the proper context in the Japanese culture.

Cristina  Munoz

Cristina Munoz

Bryn Mawr
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. David Bennett
Project title
Environmental Justice Factors and Change in Los Angeles County, California
Abstract

This research aims to add perspectives in which to study environmental justice, originally seen a community’s disproportionate exposure to environmental contamination by polluting facilities due to a factor of race— thus being discriminatory. We base our research on an earlier case study done by Tom Boer, and colleagues in 1997 that explored environmental racism and the demographics of hazardous waste in Los Angeles County, CA.

Vivian  Ortiz Baez

Vivian Ortiz Baez

UPR @ Ponce
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Tara Smith
Project title
Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Cedar County, Iowa
Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most prevalent human pathogens and may cause up to one third of bacterial disease. As S. aureus is one of the top infectious diseases with high mortality in the Unites States, recent studies have focused on how this versatile pathogen adapts and infects its human host. We performed a study of the prevalence of methicillin- susceptible S. aureus (MMSA) and methicillin- resistant S. aureus (MSRA), among farmers and voters in Cedar County, Iowa. While we have observed a high prevalence of S.

Harold  Ortiz Medina

Harold Ortiz Medina

UPR @ Aguadilla
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Daniel Eberl
Project title
Role of the ct Transcription Factor in Reciprocal Regulation of Cyp4 and Cyp6 Gene Expression
Abstract

Transcription factors are proteins that bind and recognize specific sites of the DNA and regulate gene expression. Ct (cut) is a gene that encodes a transcription factor requires for development of Johnston’s organ, the auditory organ in the Drosophila antenna. Our laboratory uses Drosophila melanogaster, an easily manipulated experimental animal to test the target genes regulated by ct in the Johnston’s organ. Based on microarray data, we hypothesize that ct regulates the expression Cyp4 and Cyp6 genes.

Julissa  Pagan Pena

Julissa Pagan Pena

UPR @ San Juan
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Anne Skinstad
Project title
Substance Use Disorder in Hispanic/Latina Women
Abstract

Women face many challenges that influence the development of health problems such as mental disorders. Those challenges vary according to the cultural context. Hispanic/Latina women have particular challenges and needs that differ from Caucasian women, African American women and others women from different ethnicity/race. Also is important to mention the difference between men and women, even when are from the same ethnicity/ race. These differences in challenges and needs are especially relevant when working with a specific disorder.

Alexandrea  Pitzer

Alexandrea Pitzer

Penn State University
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Ryan Lalumiere
Project title
Systemic Administration of the Allosteric AMPA Receptor Potentiator PEPA Reduces Cocaine Seeking on the First Day of Extinction in Rats
Abstract

Studies into the neurobiology that underlies drug seeking behavior may be valuable in the treatment of drug addiction and relapse. This research intends to understand the neurobiology of drug seeking behaviors by studying those behaviors in rats. Prior research shows that microinjections of the AMPA receptor potentiator PEPA into the IL suppresses drug-seeking behavior. PEPA injected into the mPFC before extinction training facilitates extinction of fear memory, and post-extinction training PEPA microinjections into the IL also enhance retention of extinction learning.

Shanique  Powell

Shanique Powell

Florida A & M Univ
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Barry Carter
Project title
Participation in Medication Therapy Management is Associated With Reduced Medication Discrepancies
Abstract

Community pharmacists now participate in medication therapy management (MTM) where they make recommendations to change therapy for participants at risk for medication-related problems. One such problem includes discrepancies between what patients’ say that they are taking compared with physician or pharmacy records. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if there are fewer medication discrepancies for patients recently discharged from the hospital and who receive medications from a pharmacy that participates in on the two MTM programs in Iowa.

Tabitha  Reynolds

Tabitha Reynolds

Arkansas State U
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Kathyrn Gerken
Project title
A Look at Relationship Between Reading Scores Across Three Grade Levels
Abstract

The 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress report indicated that more than 40 % of children in the United States were reading below the basic skills expected in reading. Reading is a critical skill that must be developed early in the academic years and students without basic reading skills have difficulty throughout school and in many subject areas. Thus it is imperative that difficulties in reading be identified early so interventions can be put in place.

Raymond  Sanders

Raymond Sanders

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Daniel Tranel
Project title
Differences in Experience and Expression of Emotions Between Blacks and Whites
Abstract

Emotions are a part of our everyday lives; emotions often govern what we do and how we react to a certain situation. Our emotions are more than just an ever-changing mood; they embody our personality and behavioral traits. Emotion has been linked to human behavior by multiple academic articles, but still, very little is known about emotion and how it translates to human behavior. How do individuals differ in the way they experience and express emotion? Is there a gender or race difference?

Eva  Serem

Eva Serem

Univ of Minn/Mankato
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Amnon Kohen
Project title
The Effect of Methotrexate (MTX) on N5, N10 Methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHF) Uptake by Human Cancer Cell: Development of a New PET probe
Abstract

N5, N10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHF) is a cofactor, which is essential for the reductive methylation of 2’-deoxyuridine-5’-monophosphate (dUMP) RO 2’-deoxythymidine-5’-monophosphate (dTMP) catalyzed by thymidylate synthase (TSase). A recent in vitro study conducted in our group has provided evidence that human cancer cell lines with over-expressed TSase protein and membrane-bound folate receptors exhibit three-to ten-fold higher uptake of MTHF, when compared with the normal cells from the same organs.

Jamisha  Stuard

Jamisha Stuard

Univ of the Virgin Isl
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Stewart Ehly
Project title
Iowa School Administrators' Perceptions of Home Schoolers
Abstract

Home schooling offers an alternative to public and private school attendance while still meeting the legal requirements of compulsory education and attendance laws in the United States. Within the state of Iowa, CPI students are defined as those students whose educational program is managed primarily by their families. This includes students who are schooled in the home, either fully or partially, or in a non-accredited, nonpublic school. These students may be enrolled part-time in campus-based schools or virtual schools or share instruction with other families.

Angela  Torres

Angela Torres

UPR @ Aguadilla
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Apollina Goel
Project title
Role of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Myeloma Cell Proliferation
Abstract

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a systemic, plasma cell neoplasm that currently remains incurable. MM tumors frequently exhibit a deregulated expression of D-type cyclins that is rendered by genetic rearrangements. D-type cyclins are known to favor cell proliferation by inducing expression of E-cyclins, which facilitate the passage of cells through the cell cycle restriction point “R” at the G1-S phase boundary.

Miranda  Verry

Miranda Verry

University of Iowa
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Elizabeth Altmaier
Project title
Student Motivation and Self-Efficacy in Mathematics: A Qualitative Study
Abstract

Factors influencing student achievement in mathematics are of unique interest to researchers in educational psychology. The present study serves as a preliminary qualitative assessment of student motivation, attitudes, and self-efficacy regarding mathematics. Students (N=5, age range = 10-13 years) took part in a brief focus group at the conclusion of their participation in a week –long career exploration program for at-risk-youth.

Bernie  White

Bernie White

UCLA
Participation year
2011
Mentor
Dr. Tarrell Portman
Project title
Dispelling the Four Year Old Black Boy Model: Construction, Deconstruction, and Resilience of African American Males in the Educational System
Abstract

The purpose of this research project is to provide a critical view of research related to the resilience of African American males within the U.S education system. So far, there has been little research pertaining to different individual and environmental factors that promote educational resilience among African American low-income urban males (Howard 2003). To date, research has focused on middle class African American male students and their relationship with and their perceptions of, academic counselors and teachers.