Past SROP Scholars

Diana  Adebambo

Diana Adebambo

Norfolk State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Jeff Murray
Project title
The Genetic Association of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in Preterm Birth
Abstract

The significance of this study is to determine the role of Matrix Metalloproteinase, also known as MMP9 in preterm births. Most pregnancies undergo 40 weeks of gestation, babies born between 37 and 42 completed weeks of gestation are called full term. Babies born before 37 weeks of gestation are called premature. Proteins of the Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) family are involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix in normal physiological process such as embryonic development, reproduction, and tissue remodeling.

Ashley  Akubuiro

Ashley Akubuiro

Oakwood University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Sergio Paradiso
Project title
Engagement with Fictional Characters and Neuroticism Predict Anxious Attachment Style: Age Effects
Abstract

Background and aims. The present study aimed at examining the extent to which attachment style (purportedly acquired early in life and thought to be stable throughout the stages of development) remains constant across the adult lifespan. Anxious Attachment (AA) style was assessed by the degree of emotional distress experienced in the context of close romantic relationships. Psychological traits with potential effects on individual differences in AA including general emotional distress/anxiety (Neuroticism) and empathic style were examined.

Myrissa  Alston

Myrissa Alston

Winston Salem State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Jackie Bickenbach
Project title
The Effects of Oxygen Tension on Human Skin Keratinocyte Proliferation
Abstract

Our goal was to determine the differences in epidermal proliferation between keratinocytes obtained from young and old human skin. When the skin is wounded, it has to go through a rehabilitation process. The length of this process can vary in time depending on the health of the cells and their environment. With increased age, wound healing becomes slower. Earlier in vitro work has shown that young skin cells migrate faster in low oxygen tension (4%) than high oxygen tension (21%), whereas older skin cells migrate faster in higher oxygen tension than in low oxygen tension (Fig 2).

Chasity  Bell

Chasity Bell

Louisiana College
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Stewart Ehly
Project title
Functional Analysis and Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior in Children with Autism
Abstract

Individuals with developmental disabilities often engage in challenging self-injurious behavior (SIB). An evaluation of SIB exhibited by a young woman with autism was investigated. First, a functional analysis (FA) was conducted to identify the conditions under which SIB was most likely to occur. Its purpose was to define the problematic behavior and eliminate the behavior by manipulating antecedents and consequences by replacing them with more appropriate behaviors.

Sheila  Berrios Nazario

Sheila Berrios Nazario

Univeristy of Puerto Rico at Humacao
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Tara Smith
Project title
Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin Susceptible Staphyloccocus Aureus (MSSA) in Iowa Pig Farms
Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is a nosocomial pathogen that causes several diseases, including endocarditis, pneumonia, toxic-shock syndrome and food poisoning. It has been documented previously by our research group the presence of methicillin susceptible Staphyloccous aureus (MSSA) in U.S. swine and in swine farmers. We hypothesized that the MSSA found in swine and swine farmers would not present the pvl (Panton-Valentine leukocidin) gene, which is more common in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Veronica  Bonilla Pacheco

Veronica Bonilla Pacheco

Pontifical Catholic University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Edward Wasserman
Project title
Is a specialized face-processing system necessary for the other-race effect to occur?
Abstract

It has been proposed that face recognition in primates depends on a specialized mechanism, different from the system used to recognize other objects, physically located in the fusiform gyrus of the right medial temporal lobe (the fusiform face area). One interesting aspect of human face recognition is the other-race effect; the finding that people are more accurate in recognizing faces of their own race than faces of other races.

Latiche  Bush-Lane

Latiche Bush-Lane

Jackson State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Mary Campbell
Project title
Adolescents' Attitudes Toward Sexual Relationships with Their Multiracial Peers
Abstract
A number of studies have investigated adolescent inter-racial relationships and marriage, but no research exists on adolescent sexual relationships with multiracial adolescents. This study was designed to examine the attitudes of adolescents towards having sexual relationships with their multiracial peers. The influences of race, gender, and prior sexual experiences with multiracial individuals are factors that the study seeks to investigate. This paper compares the attitudes of 110 students, recruited from summer classes and enrichment programs at the University of Iowa.
Cameron  Carter

Cameron Carter

Colorado State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Mark Yorek
Project title
Diet Induced Obesity in Sprague Dawley Rats: Effect on Microvascular and Neural Function
Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of diet induced obesity (DIO) on microvascular and neural function. Rats were fed a standard or high fat diet for 32 weeks. Vasodilation in epineurial arterioles was measured by videomicroscopy, endoneurial blood flow by hydrogen clearance, nerve conduction velocity following electrical stimulation of motor or sensory nerves and thermal nociception using the Hargreaves method. Rats fed a high fat diet developed sensory neuropathy as indicated by slowing of sensory nerve conduction velocity and thermal hypoalgesia.

Jennifer  Claludio Malave

Jennifer Claludio Malave

Pontifical Catholic University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Gail Bishop
Project title
Optimizing the Use of B lymphocyte Cellular Vaccines
Abstract

Despite difficulty in isolation and expansion, dendritic cells (DCs) have been used as immunotherapeutic agents in human cancer trials. Our search for viable alternatives to DCs focuses on B cells due to ease of isolation, activation, and their function as antigen presenting cells (APCs). While DCs are more effective at presenting antigen to naïve T cells, we hypothesized that multiple Bvac (B cell vaccine) injections would enhance their effectiveness.

Jose  Claudio Malave

Jose Claudio Malave

Pontifical Catholic University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. John Butler
Project title
The Effect of Surgical Removal of the Ileal Peyer´s Patches on the Histology Numbers and Clonal Diversity of B cells in the MLN and JPP
Abstract

The Ileal peyer´s patches (IPP) have been known to be excellent B cell developers. In recent studies it was shown that piglets that were surgically intervened and had only 10% of the IPP were showing a decreased development of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and (JPP) jejuna peyer´s patches. This experiment identified the crucial role that the IPP plays as an excellent source of B cell development. However, it is not known whether the IPP is the principal developer of B cells for the MLN and JPP or not.

Quinnetta  Claytor

Quinnetta Claytor

University of Iowa
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Thomas Vaughn
Project title
Social Class and Mental Health: A Descriptive Analysis of socioeconomic Status and Mental Health Diagnoses among Youth Served by Community Mental Health Programs in Northeast Iowa
Abstract

Objective: To conduct a descriptive analysis on the first cohort of families enrolled in the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services Program in ten northeast Iowa counties. This Project is an analysis of preliminary data from a community mental health services initiative serving children and their families in northeast Iowa. Two general theories, social causation theory and social selection theory, attempt to describe the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and health (La Veist 171).

Jarrett  David

Jarrett David

Morehouse College
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Jun Ni
Project title
 Nanotechnology
Abstract
  

HIV, human immunodeficiency virus can possibly lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It impacts the health of people's daily life. HIV/AIDS remains a great challenge to all the ethnic groups and nations. For example, African Americans are hit the hardest, according to Center of Disease Control (CDC), making up 49% of HIV/AIDS victims.

Pauline  Dixon

Pauline Dixon

California State, Dominquez Hills
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Vershawn Young
Project title
Performance Stigmas: Michelle Obama
Abstract

The way in which a person carries themselves, acts, or performs speaks volumes to those around them. Using Richard Schechner's definition of performance as all of the activity of a person at one point that may influence another, it can be said that performance is what people use to characterize and judge others, whether negatively or positively. This performance will be seen as good or bad according to the stigma, as Erving Goffman defined it, that is associated with the performance.

Omer  Elgaali

Omer Elgaali

University of Iowa
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. H. S. Udaykumar
Project title
Generation of 3D Microstructures
Abstract
 

Laboratory experiments are the basis of any branch of science.  Inability of performing an experiment could stand as a barrier for the advancement of a branch of science.  The two that contribute to this inability are cost and sensitivity.  It is the purpose of this research to enable scientists to perform experiments on the computer.  More specifically, it aims to simulate the flow of matter in various mediums.  It could be used to study many areas.  Some are the flow of red blood cells, oil extraction, and river flow.  Also, static particles such as granular microstructures could be exa

Kwesi  Ewoodzie

Kwesi Ewoodzie

Ithaca College
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Michael Lovaglia
Project title
Youth Engagement in Community Organizations: Issues of Attracting and Retaining Youth
Abstract
 

Each organization faces issues of retention and attraction of its members. This study explores issues of youth engagement in youth community organizations through a qualitative study. Literature identifies certain techniques used by adult leaders as more effective than others. In general these techniques need to be able to address the youth's need for autonomy, relatedness, and guidance. We took a closer look at the techniques by interviewing youth organization leaders about their experience in the area of community organizations.

Jasmine  Freeman

Jasmine Freeman

Fort Valley State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Sarah Larsen
Project title
Stability of Nanocrystalline NaY Zeiolite in Aqueous Solutions
Abstract

Scientific awareness of how zeolites, a very distinctive type of microporous aluminosilicates, undergo dissolution in aqueous solutions with various ph's is limited. Zeolites are three-dimensional, crystalline compounds which are built from AlO4 and SiO4 tetrahedra. A defining feature of zeolites is that their frameworks are made up of 4-connected networks of atoms. Understanding the dissolution of zeolites is fundamental to a number of processes occurring in medicine and throughout industry.

Miriam  Garcia

Miriam Garcia

University of Texas at El Paso
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Craig Just
Project title
High Frequency Water Quality Measurements in Clear Creek
Abstract

Clear Creek, a 270km2 watershed located west of Coralville, IA, is heavily influenced by anthropogenic nutrient sources, exhibits erratic flows, and is very susceptible to extreme erosion of its banks during heavy rains. These rains contaminate the creek with excessive amounts of nutrients, sediment, and urban-related toxins, contributing to poor quality of downstream waterways. Water and its contaminants flow from the Iowa River to the Mississippi River and then discharge into the Gulf of Mexico.

Katia  Gonzalez Lorenzo

Katia Gonzalez Lorenzo

Univeristy of Puerto at Aguadilla
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Daniel Tranel
Project title
Neural Correlates of Framing Effects
Abstract
 

Framing effects are one type of bias in which "decision makers respond differently to different but objectively equivalent descriptions of the same problem" (Levin et al. 1998). Framing effects have been demonstrated in many domains, like in choices about monetary outcome and in questions pertaining to the loss of human lives. Valence framing is one type of framing effects in which people can be biased to make different judgments when a situation is framed positively versus negatively.

Rekesha  Greenwood

Rekesha Greenwood

Louisiana State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Robert Philibert
Project title
Genetic, Epigenetic and Clinical Correlates of Parental Bonding Assessments in the Iowa Adoption Studies
Abstract
 

Background: The amount of parental investment or attachment to their offspring is an important determinant of offspring success.  Using animal models, a number of groups have demonstrated that these attachment behaviors are strongly influenced by both genetic and epigenetic factors.  In particular, variation in the serotonergic pathway has been strongly implicated.  Unfortunately, studies of these influences in humans using traditional family study designs are strongly biased by residual gene environment correlations.  

Sharniece  Holland

Sharniece Holland

Alabama State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Rodica Curtu
Project title
Multistability in Visual Perception: A Mathematical Approach
Abstract

Why when we have two eyes and each of which we support perception by itself, we do not see two of everything? If we present two different images to each eye then a competition arises, a neuronal competition. When the eyes are presented with two distinct and conflicting images, an alternation between these on a timescale of seconds is reported. The phenomenon is termed binocular rivalry and has been investigated in psychophysical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) experiments, and more recently within a modeling approach (1, 2, 4-7).

Mayra  Ibarra

Mayra Ibarra

Scripps College
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. James Throgmorton
Project title
Research for Sustainability in the Iowa River Watershed
Abstract

Place encompasses ideas of identity, environment, and community. These are topics that are important to gaining a better understanding of society. In researching sustainability in the Iowa River watershed focus was given to theories of place and ideas about sustainability of community and place; taking into account the many factors that affect place construction and identity including context within a larger geographical area, integration of new immigrants, and outside influences.

Bianca  Jimenez Torres

Bianca Jimenez Torres

University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Stewart Ehly
Project title
Competent Private Instruction in Iowa
Abstract

The purpose of this research was to profile the homeschooled population of the state of Iowa during the academic years of 2003-04 and 2004-05. Iowa law requires that parents complete Form A at the beginning of a school year. The form documents that families are conducting homeschooling, designated in Iowa as Competent Private Instruction (CPI). Researchers collected information in Form A from all Area Education Agencies in the state of Iowa. A database containing information on all of the parent's responses was created.

Amber  Johnson

Amber Johnson

Alabama State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Megan Foley Nicpon
Project title
Examining Self-Concept in High Ability Children with Autism
Abstract

Difficulties with social situations, social cues, and/or social interactions are some of the most notable symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders ( ASD), yet few have investigated how this may impact self-concept among students diagnosed with any of the three ASDs: autism, Asperger Syndrome, or Pervasive Developmental Disorder, NOS (PDD-NOS). The present study examines academic, physical, intellectual, behavioral, social, and emotional self-concept among high ability children and adolescents diagnosed with autism or Asperger Syndrome/PDD-NOS.

Ryessia  Jones

Ryessia Jones

University of Kentucky
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Vershawn Young
Project title
Two Identities, One Body: Examining the Racial Performance of Leanita McClain
Abstract

Living in a society where African Americans are forced to consciously chance their performance to be successful in mainstream America causes anxiety which thus can lead up to suicide. In order to achieve and maintain mainstream success, middle-class African Americans are forced to have two different identities. Using the framework of W.E.B. Du Bois' double consciousness (1868) and Erving Goffman's face theory (1967), the purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of anxiety primarily in the late Leanita McClain.

Maritza  Loaiza

Maritza Loaiza

University of Costa Rica
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Mary Campbell
Project title
Multiracial Attitudes within Primary and Secondary Relationships
Abstract

As the number of multiracial individuals (those with parents of different races) in the United States rises, the implications for public opinion about this demographic shift become important in light of the racial stratification of our society. Studying student attitudes towards multiracial individuals permits us to predict future group behavior as well as to comprehend the social racial structure in which young people are immersed.

Kevin  Lucas

Kevin Lucas

Western Illinois University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Marshall Poe
Project title
Mechanical Icon: A "Book" of Video Essays on Historic Photographs
Abstract

Mechanical Icon is an educational experiment in historical interpretation and dissemination. Its aim is to place iconic photographs in historical context by means of short videos. We often do not see photographs as "standing for" something, but instead we see them as "depicting" something. But some photographs can and do "stand for" something, and though they have some symbolic value they are not really symbols because they are not really arbitrary. We couldn't substitute out any key components of the photograph and still expect it to "mean" the same thing.

Laura  Miranda

Laura Miranda

University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Irwin Levin
Project title
Illusion of Control (experimenter versus subject) and Confidence in Children's and Adult's Predictions of Uncertain Outcomes
Abstract

According to Shiezek and Henry (1989), confidence affects whether a possible course of actions actually followed. Inappropriate confidence is a threat to successful decision making and implementation, resulting in different types of problems, including mental health related problems. An example is the Gamblers Fallacy effect, where some decision makers believe that a string of bad luck will be followed by good luck.

Keyon  Mitchell

Keyon Mitchell

Loyola Marymount University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Chun-Fang Wu
Project title
Qvr Mutants and Motors Skills: Flies and Their Ability to Groove Through A Tube
Abstract

The objective of this research is to observe how flies move through vials separated by a sieve and variations due to environmental factors in a fly's ability to go through the sieve. Such information may suggest a category of genes that play a role in their motor skills. The mutant flies in this experiment are qvr1, qvr2, qvr ∆p-6, and qvr∆p-7. CS wild-type flies were the control. Flies were collected and placed in an empty plastic vial with a sieve located above them.

Elizabeth  Musz

Elizabeth Musz

Carleton College
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Shaun Vecera
Project title
Consequences of Figure-Ground Perception: Attentional Spreading and Spatial Resolution
Abstract
This experiment investigated how figure-ground assignment mediates the perceptual segregation of textures. Both figure-ground assignment and attention have been shown to enhance a target stimulus' spatial resolution and accelerate perceptual processing. In a texture-segmentation task in which performance peaks at mid-periphery and drops at both central and peripheral locations, attention improves performance at peripheral locations but hinders performance at central locations (Yeshurun & Carrasco, 1998).
Angelina  Nortey

Angelina Nortey

State University of NY at Binghamton
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Kathryn Gerken
Project title
I Need Help Too: The Mental Health Needs of Alternative High School Students
Abstract

It is estimated that 7.5 million children in the United States do not receive the mental health services they need (Flisher et al., 1997; Kataoka et al, 2002). This is alarming given the negative outcomes for children with untreated mental health disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the mental health needs of a group of youth in alternative high schools across Iowa. Additionally, this study served to assess whether the youth in alternative high schools differed in mental needs compared to those in traditional high schools and examined gender differences.

Maria  Quinones

Maria Quinones

University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Amy Poremba
Project title
Neuronal Activity in Primate Prefrontal Cortex during an Auditory Memory Task
Abstract

At least two neural pathways, a dorsal pathway for localization of sound sources and a ventral pathway for recognition of auditory objects may process auditory information. These processing pathways converge in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and this area is involved in working memory for visual stimuli and may have the same involvement of auditory information. Some studies have shown that there are neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that respond to sounds. However, many of these studies have only used a few numbers of example stimuli such as monkey vocalization and pure tones.

Latisha  Ramsey

Latisha Ramsey

University of Virgin Islands
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Edward Wasserman
Project title
Do pigeons know what they know and behave accordingly?
Abstract

Metacognition is said to be the ability to perceive one's own mental states (Metcalfe & Kober, 2005). It can also be more objectively defined as the ability to judge one's chances of success or failure at a task before actually performing it (Jozefowiez, Staddon, & Ceretti, 2009). For centuries, metacognition has been claimed to be uniquely human; but, it may be that animals exhibit this ability as well. Metacognition has recently been reported in several different animals including monkeys, orangutans, dolphins, and rats.

Dorian  Richardson

Dorian Richardson

North Carolina A & T University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. David Soll
Project title
The Role of Mena and PTEN in Cancer Cell Motility and Chemotaxis
Abstract

Mena, a phosphoprotein that regulates actin dynamics in lamellipodia of migratory cells, and PTEN, a phosphatase involved in signal transduction, are two proteins that have been implicated in human cancer cell motility and chemotaxis. A variant of Mena (Mena+++) is expressed in an invasive subpopulation of mammary cancer cells that exhibit robust chemotaxis to epidermal growth factor (EGF). These observations have led to the hypothesis that EGF recruits carcinoma cells expressing the highly invasive Mena isoform into blood vessels, leading to metastasis.

Javier  Rodriguez-Cardona

Javier Rodriguez-Cardona

University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Daniel Tranel
Project title
Higher-order Theory of Mind or Memory for Complex Content
Abstract

Higher-order Theory of Mind or Memory for Complex ContentComplex social interaction may require an ability to infer and understand the thoughts of other social agents (‘Theory of Mind', ToM). Since humans are an incredibly social species, a highly developed ability to infer recursive thoughts about thoughts might be expected.

Ta'janette  Sconyers

Ta'janette Sconyers

Truman State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Kathryn Gerken
Project title
I Need Help Too: The Mental Health Needs of Alternative High School Students
Abstract

It is estimated that 7.5 million children in the United States do not receive the mental health services they need (Flisher et al., 1997; Kataoka et al, 2002). This is alarming given the negative outcomes for children with untreated mental health disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the mental health needs of a group of youth in alternative high schools across Iowa. Additionally, this study served to assess whether the youth in alternative high schools differed in mental needs compared to those in traditional high schools and examined gender differences.

Angelica  Serrano Ortiz

Angelica Serrano Ortiz

Pontifical Catholoic University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Lyombe Eko
Project title
Globalization and Latino Musicians in Mainstream American Popular Music: A Lyrical Analysis
Abstract

Globalization has led to the interconnection of nations, peoples and cultures. It is generally assumed that the United States is the primary driver of globalization which exports its culture to all parts of the world. However, the United States is not immune from globalization. Music in the United States is affected by music from other parts of the world. This is especially true of Latin music that comes mostly from Puerto Rico as well as from Mexico, Colombia, and Cuba.

Ashley  Sheriff

Ashley Sheriff

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Corey Creekmur
Project title
Reproducing Criminology in Detective Fiction: Sherlock Holmes as a Medium for Biological Determinism
Abstract

Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes series helped the emerging British middle-class make sense of the steep rise in crime and Britain's close interaction with colonized countries in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Doyle introduced a machine-like man who quickly identified criminals, providing a false sense of security against crime and foreigners. This project argues that Doyle applied pseudo-scientific theories that claimed people were biologically predisposed to inferiority and criminality.

Crystal  Stoll

Crystal Stoll

Michigan State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Carolyn Colvin
Project title
The Importance of a Mentor to Latino/a Undergraduate Success
Abstract

The purpose of our study is to document the perceptions of self-identified Latino/a faculty, staff, and administrators related to their contributions as mentors for Latino/a undergraduate students. We explored the characteristics of effective mentors who are University of Iowa faculty, staff, and administrators. Second, we interviewed self-identified Latino/a undergraduate students to better understand the characteristics of Latino/a mentors who are faculty, staff, and administrators on campus.

Yesenia  Torres

Yesenia Torres

University of Puerto Rico at San Juan
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Steven Anderson
Project title
Age of Stroke Onset and Long-term Cognitive Outcome
Abstract

Strokes are more common among the elderly; however they can occur at any age across lifespan. Clinical lore and some studies have suggested that younger age of onset results in a better cognitive outcome; however few studies have evaluated the relationship between age of stroke onset and long term cognitive recovery. We tested the hypothesis that younger age of stroke onset will result in a better cognitive outcome than strokes occurring later in life. We analyzed the neuropsychological test performances given to patients (n=557) following a single stroke at least 3 months post onset.

Nghia  Tran

Nghia Tran

University of Iowa
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Andrew Kusiak
Project title
Fault Identification for Gearbox using Artificial Intelligent Network
Abstract

Due to the high costs for operation and maintenance in the wind power industry, many utility companies and wind farm owners are focusing on cost reduction for operation and maintenance.

Jaleisa  Turner

Jaleisa Turner

Claflin University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Kevin Legge
Project title
Effects of pulmonary virus co-infection on virus specific CD8 T cell immunity
Abstract

Influenza A virus (IAV) and Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are two of the most common viruses that cause respiratory infections affecting young children and the elderly. Studies are now showing the presence of dual infections. Although the importance of CD8 T cell immunity to pulmonary virus clearance is well documented, little is known of the immune response to both the primary and secondary viruses. With that rationale in mind, our goal was to determine if the response of virus specific CD8 T cells is altered due to pulmonary virus co-infections.

Indira  Turney

Indira Turney

University of Virgin Islands, St. Croix
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Michael Lovaglia
Project title
Mate Selection in Younger People
Abstract
 

Today, more women than men are obtaining doctorate degrees, which will result in an increase in pay, higher education, and increased social status. This phenomenon will bring about a change in mate selection since previous research has shown that inconsistency in spouse's income is a significant predictor of marital satisfaction (Nock & Wilcox, 2006). In addition, with the steady decline in our current economy, a mate with great earning potential may be more desirable. This study examines what factors influence college educated men and women's choice of mate.

Whitney  Williams

Whitney Williams

Alabama State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Susanne Morton
Project title
Retention of a Newly Learned Visuomotor Adaptation
Abstract

Visuomotor adaptation is the ability to adjust movement in response to changes in visuospatial perception. When visual feedback of hand movement is rotated relative to true hand movement, healthy adults gradually adapt arm reaching by rotating hand movement an equal amount in the opposite direction. The extent to which this type of learning can be retained is not known. Here, we investigated retention of a newly learned leg reaching visuomotor adaptation in a cohort of five healthy young adults.

Jasmine  Wilson

Jasmine Wilson

Jackson State University
Participation year
2009
Mentor
Dr. Sara Sanders
Project title
Development of Assessment Tools for a Psychosocial Educational Group
Abstract

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among older adults. According to statistics by the Alzheimer's Association, there are 5.3 million people in the United States are living with this degenerative condition. Because Alzheimer's is not a normal process of aging, diagnosed individuals require assistance from some type of caregiver as the disease progresses. Establishing and maintaining daily routines can prove difficult and can create frustration, aggression, and other negativity in diagnosed individuals, which adversely impacts the caregiver.